Game Writing


Instant Drama – Just Add Failure – Part 2

Previously, I discussed how failure makes for good stories, but writing failure into games is challenging. Because while players may appreciate the drama of failure, they hate failing. Today I’m back with some ideas for how to incorporate failure into your game story without adding failure to your game play. First, a note on player…

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Instant Drama – Just Add Failure – Part 1

Failure is important for good storytelling. Failure is what drives stories forward, what drives protagonists to try stupid, risky things, what raises the stakes so that what started out as a minor issue turns into a life-threatening crisis. Without fear of failure, there is no tension. Without actual failure from time to time, that fear becomes…

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Games + Storyworlds: Know Your Scope

When developing a game story, it’s important to understand the scope of the story you’re telling. The narrower the scope, the more limited (but more detailed) the story. The broader the scope, the more wide-open (but less focused) the story becomes. At the narrowest end of the scale, the player experiences a specific story with…

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Games + Storyworlds: Board Game Stories

When I mention “game stories” and “game writing,” chances are people’s thoughts immediately go to video games. That fair. Video games are great at telling stories, what with their cutscenes, character dialog, environmental details, and dozens of other techniques developed over the years. Video game storytelling is totally a thing. …Which is why I want…

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Games + Storyworlds: Making it Personal

Two essential elements of any good story are conflict and characters. This is true whether that story is delivered by movie, novel, a series of drunk and increasingly belligerent Facebook posts… or through a game. Finding the conflict in a game story is usually as easy as finding a funny cat video on the Internet….

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